Tinderbox Forum

Resize many notes at once?


(Beck Tench) #1

Is it possible to select several notes at once and resize them all to the same size in one action?


(Pat Maddox) #2

I don’t know about using the handles to drag them to a specific size, but you can use quickstamp to set Width and Height for multiple notes.

edit: similarly, you could drag one to the size you want, and get its Width and Height and apply it to the other notes w/ quickstamp or some other action code / scripting mechanism.


(Mark Anderson) #3

No - though I get the idea, but that’s more of a drawing space mechanism, and Tinderbox isn’t a drawing app per se. It used to be the community valued the untidiness - or lack of over curation - of maps but it seems we’re giving into the the notion that neatness imparts insight (personally, I remain unconvinced).

$Height and $Width are intrinsic. But, don’t overlook View menu, Arrange -. Equal width or Equal Height. Note that such actions take their queue from the first selected item of the current selection.


(Beck Tench) #4

Arrange is a perfect solution for this specific use case (dragging several articles from Devonthink to figure out relationships between them). I could see the stamp working well for future efforts, as well. Thank you, both, Mark and Pat!


(Kay Krämer) #5

I think, I am a bit autistic in this area :slight_smile: … I prefer tidiness. Perhaps as a counterweight to some chaos in my head :crazy_face:


(Mark Anderson) #6

I think much of our propensity towards tidiness is something learned at home and school. Control and consistency are aided by order and conformity. Thus, part of journey I’ve made in using Tinderbox is learning to eschew a learned liking for orderliness where it is only there without purpose.

That’s taught me that the clarity needed when communicating new or strange things to others, doesn’t necessarily help when the audience is just myself. At the early discovery stage, tidiness can simply obfuscate. When investigating the linkages and relationships in information and knowledge, order can confuse by implying relationships that do not in fact exist.


(Kay Krämer) #7

Wisely spoken… sounds reasonable


(Niran Sabanathan) #8

For me the issue is not having notes of the same size of uniformity, but being easily able to define a note’s viewable size. This would be analogous to fit column width in a spreadsheet. If either the width or height of a note is held constant, it would be nice if there was a keyboard command to resize the note to include all of the title.


(Mark Anderson) #9

Have you tried:

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(Niran Sabanathan) #10

Thank you, Mark. Funny, I had seen the Expand Horizontally and Expand Vertically, but for some reason, I needed your red box to see Expand Proportionately. Expand proportionately works nicely. Using keyboard maestro, I can trigger the shortcut for any given note or a selection of notes.

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(RobTrew) #11

Neatness does seem an improbable source of insight, but perhaps a poor signal-to-noise ratio is also unlikely to spark much creativity ?

As pruning and integration continue, less graphic noise probably does reduce some friction in revealing and communicating whatever is emerging or being built.

(If the visual and spatial embedding didn’t make text more tractable and expressive, we might not reach for Tinderbox in the first place - a plain text outliner with tags and a scripting interface might well be more than enough)


(John Miller) #12

Hmmm, not sure I agree here, Mark. Clearly, different people think differently and respond differently to visual stimulation. Part of the power of GTD, for example, is that you have a place for everything and everything in its place - you don’t have to carry it around in your (very messy) head, or have them in your visual field to distract you. You put stuff away and only deal with it in turn. “Mind like water” and all that.

Many of us software engineers tend to habitually make our code “beautiful” and elegant, such that we can up-level our thoughts to manage the complexity at a higher level. Good coding hygiene, e.g., OOP encapsulation, make it more understandable and keeps the messy details from obfuscating the structure you’ve so carefully given it.

And I’m only half-joking when I say that this sort of habitual, even compulsive tendencies towards form-following-function aesthetic beauty in an otherwise chaotic world may be at least partly genetic. I’m Dutch on my Mom’s side, and while I’ve never lived in Netherlands, I’ve read up on Dutch culture and recognized myself in many examples: if you hang clothes out to dry, don’t be surprised if you come back and find your clothes rearranged on the line in a more aesthetically pleasing way.

In any case, different people are comfortable with different levels of clutter. We just draw the line in different places - and likely draw it in different places under different circumstances. To paraphrase Einstein, IMHO things should be as tidy as possible, but no tidier.

My two cents only.

– jdm


(Mark Anderson) #13

No argument here, this is a broad church. My point is not that things should be ‘messy’, but rather that they may be and, in exploratory work, can help with serendipitous discovery. :grinning: